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Bending Branch Winery

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Bill Fore
 
December 2, 2020 | Bill Fore

Introducing our first Magnum

~Exclusively for 1840 Custom Case Club Members~

For the first time, Bending Branch bottled large formats of one of its premium wines, 2017 Petite Sirah, Newsom Vineyards. When tasting wines from the barrel in 2019, it was clear that this wine was special. Plans were made to bottle it in magnums, and we packaged enough to offer each 1840 Custom Case Club member the opportunity to add one magnum bottle to their December club release. We were thrilled, and not surprised, when this wine was awarded Double Gold at the 2021 San Antonio Stock Show & Rodeo Wine Competition.

The shape and color of a wine bottle are often associated with a specific region or wine style such as Burgundy or Bordeaux. There are antique styles, traditional styles, and flashy shapes driven by modern wine marketing. The weight of wine bottles also varies broadly from simple glass to high-tech, ultraviolet resistant glass with a deep punt and thickness that results in heft intended to imply prestige.

In addition to the standard 750 milliliter wine bottle, there are a couple dozen recognized bottle sizes, though few of them are in common usage. Small sizes such as the “split” and the half-bottle are useful in the consumer market. The magnum, equal to two standard bottles, is the most popular large-format bottle, making an impressive presentation. Larger, ceremonial-size bottles, often named for Biblical kings and historical figures, include a range that tops out with the colossal 30-liter Melchizedek.

Aside from the fun of having a Texas-size bottle on the dinner table, there are a couple of important things to know about a magnum. The air trapped between the cork and the wine, and the slight evaporation of wine through the cork, cause the gradual oxidation that helps a wine mature over time. A magnum contains twice the volume of wine, so the effect of air on the wine is reduced by half, slowing the aging process, and potentially revealing subtle nuances that may develop in the wine over longer aging. If you have the patience, aging a magnum can be rewarding, but you’ll find the Bending Branch Winery 2017 Petite Sirah, Newsom Vineyards, is delicious in any size.

1840 Case Club Members:

Quantities are extremely limited. Contact the tasting room at 830-995-2948 to purchase yours today.

Retail $95 / 1840 Case Club pricing $76

Time Posted: Dec 2, 2020 at 1:13 PM
Bill Fore
 
November 22, 2019 | Bill Fore

Thanksgiving Wine Suggestions

The thing about Thanksgiving …

Thanksgiving is that uniquely American holiday when lots of relatives who may not see each other often (or have much in common) get together for a big meal. Stuffing or dressing? Mashed or sweet? Pumpkin or pecan? And that’s before sports and politics.

Choosing wines for Thanksgiving can also seem challenging. The flavors of the traditional menu are as diverse as the guests. The key is balance.

Balance means a harmonious blend of the basic flavors in wine – tart, fruity, bitter, and alcohol. Tartness comes from acidity in grapes, fruitiness comes from ripe grapes, bitterness comes mostly from tannin in grape skins, and alcohol comes from fermentation. If any of these component flavors overwhelms the others, the wine can seem uneven or simply unpleasant. But if the acidity, tannin, fruit and alcohol are coherent and complementary, the wine is nicely balanced. 

Balanced wines have two great attributes. They are crowd-pleasers, and they taste good with many kinds of food – just the ticket for Thanksgiving. Here are a couple of good suggestions.

Turkey is a fowl, but it is also a game bird with rich, dark flavors and texture. Elegantly balanced 2018 Ursa Tannat Rosé walks the line between white and red wines, a flattering partner for the big bird. Dark meat lovers may prefer an aromatic red like the 2016 Bending Branch Tempranillo. Both these well-balanced wines are also compatible with the many heirloom side dishes on the holiday table.

The cousin who rarely drinks may prefer something a little fruitier like Bending Branch Thinkers Blanc. Also consider having a bottle of Bending Branch 2017 Texas Tannat® around for that uncle whose tastes tend toward whisky and cigars. In wine as in family, balance is the answer.

Happy Thanksgiving from the Bending Branch Family!

Time Posted: Nov 22, 2019 at 2:41 PM
Bill Fore
 
October 30, 2019 | Bill Fore

Cryo-Maceration in Winemaking

Happening now in the winery...

Cryo-Maceration – Cryo or CM for short – is a technique we use to improve the extraction of color, flavor, and tannin from the skins of red grapes. Freshly harvested grapes are destemmed, put in half-ton bins, and then taken to the freezer. As the grapes freeze, large, slow-forming ice crystals weaken the cellular structures containing tannin, pigment, and flavor. Once defrosted, the subsequent fermentation can extract about 50% more of these critical compounds than a conventional fermentation without Cryo-Maceration.

Conventional Fermentation – around 20% to 40% extraction

versus

Cryo-Maceration – around 30% to 60% extraction

The first wine in which Bending Branch employed Cryo-Maceration, the Bending Branch Winery 2011 Estate Tannat CM, was awarded Double Gold, Texas Class Champion, Class Champion, and was named Top Texas Wine at the 2014 Houston Rodeo Uncorked! International Wine Competition.

One useful side effect of Cryo-Maceration is that it allows us to defer the fermentation of a portion of our fruit until later in the season when there is more room in the winery and more time in the winemaking schedule.

 

Time Posted: Oct 30, 2019 at 12:28 PM
Bill Fore
 
March 27, 2019 | Bill Fore

Bud break in the Texas Hill Country

Lost Pirogue Vineyard in Center Point is awakening after last year’s very wet autumn, and a winter that was colder and drier than typical. Still, bud break this year was right on schedule, only a day later than in 2018. The Picpoul Blanc vines pictured here had just begun to bud out when the vineyard experienced an early March cold-snap. Some early buds may have been nipped, but many more are pushing out as the days get sunnier. Flowering is next, followed by green leaves in a couple of weeks – or sooner if the vineyard gets significant rain. Bring on harvest 2019!

Time Posted: Mar 27, 2019 at 12:00 PM